Tag Archives: world War 2

Warlord Games Releases Combined Arms

Combined arms is Warlord Games’ first board game but more importantly for the Bolt Action, Blood Red Skies and Cruel Seas players amongst you, it’s their first campaign supplement as well.

What does that mean? Well you’re able to play Combined Arms as a stand alone game using the pieces in the box to conquer Europe etc. Or you can link games of Blood Red Skies, Bolt action or Cruel Seas together for one large campaign.

Credit Warlord Games

The boxed set is priced at a very reasonable £50 and includes maps, cards and all the tokens you need to wage a complete campaign.

Bolt Action – Combined Arms is a strategic board game that commands the players to face off, seize the initiative and outwit their foe amidst the fog of war. Each game will see you fighting for control of air, land, and sea in order to claim objectives and hold them against the enemy.

Choose your theatre of war, from the western and eastern fronts to North Africa and the Pacific. Each theatre has its own challenges and opportunities, some rewarding control over the sea, some rewarding control over the skies. How many of your precious resources will you sink into each, and how much will be left to control the land? Will you rely on stealth as you move units secretly, springing up where you are least suspected, or will you attempt to overwhelm your enemy with brutal overkill?

Combined Arms can be played as a stand-alone game or players can incorporate Bolt Action, Blood Red Skies, Cruel Seas, or Victory at Sea for an epic continent-spanning campaign. Unique cards link your campaign with your chosen wargames, meaning your choices in the campaign could mean victory or defeat on the tabletop.

Combined Arms is available for Pre-order and will be shipped to customers in May.

What is Blood Red Skies?

BOARD GAME GEEK SUMMARY

Blood Red Skies is the new World War II mass air combat game from Warlord Games, written by renowned game developer Andy Chambers.

Packed with everything you need to play this fast paced air combat game, the Blood Red Skies starter set does what it says on the tin. Plus once started you’ll have the extra rules to introduce the play cards that really bring your fighter aircraft to life, allowing you to fly them just as they would have been by the Aces of WW2!

It has been given a rating of 7.4 on BoardGameGeek from 150+ ratings.

Simple but effective gameplay

Tabletop Anarchy has produced a series of videos explaining how to play Blood Red Skies.

1. Core Mechanics

2. Activation

3. Movement

4. Pilot Action

5. Shooting

6. Wingman

7. Clouds

8. Cards

9. Build A Squadron

10. Gameplay

Tabletop Anarchy also have a number of videos on painting the planes.

If you’re interested in getting into Blood Red Skies I can’t suggest you start anywhere else but these excellent collection of videos.

— Peter

What is Bolt Action?

BOARD GAME GEEK SUMMARY

It has been given a rating of 7.8 on BoardGameGeek from 550+ ratings.

Written by veteran game designers Alessio Cavatore and Rick Priestley, Bolt Action provides all the rules needed to bring the great battles of World War II to your tabletop. Using miniature soldiers, tanks and terrain, you can fight battles in the shattered towns of occupied France, the barren deserts of North Africa, and even the sweltering jungles of the Pacific.

Players get to decide which of the major or minor World War II powers they would like to represent, and then construct their armies from the lists provided. Army options are almost limitless, allowing you to build the kind of army that most appeals to your style of play. The choice is yours.

The original… now changed slightly in Warmaster Revolution

On Point HQ has produced a series of excellent videos explaining Bolt Action. I recommend checking our his other videos as well!

1. Building a Bolt Action Army

2. Unit Quality and Issuing Orders

3. Combat

4. Pinning and Morale Tests

5. HQ Units and Snap to Action

6. Transports and Tanks

7. Ambush

8. Troop and Vehicle Movement

9. Medics and Snipers

10. How HE Shots Work

11. Artillery Movement and Orders

12. The Turn Sequence

If you’re interested in getting into Bolt Action, I can’t suggest you start anywhere else but these excellent collection of videos.

Peter

Don Featherstone – A Life in Wargames (1918-2013)

Donald Featherstone is perhaps the most influential Wargamer of 20th century Britain. Because of him, Britain came to enjoy miniature wargaming as a pastime.

Don born in 1918 got into miniature wargaming after playing with H.G. Wells’ rules Little Wars which were introduced to him by his father. In 1939 Don signed up to serve in the Royal Tank Regiment after trying unsuccessfully to find service in first the RAF and then the Navy. Don feared service in the infantry following stories from both his Father and Uncle. Don managed to “negotiate” service in the tank regiments with the recruitment officers.

Once in the 51st Battalion of the Royal Tank Regiment, Don’s skill with words and the ability to type at a reasonable rate saw him move to the HQ and was appointed as clerk in the Orderly Room. Don’s battalion was posted to the Gothic Line in Northern Italy. It was here that Don had his brush with death when an enemy shell landed inside their camp where Don and his comrades were eating a meal. Don was the possibly the only one to walk away uninjured from the attack. Eventually Don left the army in January 1946.

In the 1950’s Don came across Wargames Digest produced by American Jack Scruby. This reignited Don’s love of miniature wargaming and bought back his memories of playing Little Wars with his 54mm tin soldiers. Also around this time Don met Tony Bath, who would be (beside his brother) his first wargame opponent. Tony would later become the manager of the miniatures company Miniature Figurines.

When Jack Scruby ceased producing Wargames Digest Don and Tony decided to co-edit it for Britain, followed by Don’s own Wargamer’s Newsletter which he started producing in April 1962 and continued to do so each month for 18 years until 1980. It was unfortunately discontinued due to rising costs and a declining readership.

In 1962 however players of wargames were scarce and so finding opponents particularly difficult to do. Therefore Don set up the country’s very first wargames event inside his own home, in which virtually every Wargamer at the time attended. The following year he stepped the event up and hired a function room at the local hotel, this time there were around 20 attendees. The social features included a recreation of Wells’s famous Battle of Hooks Farm using photographs from his book Little Wars on an overhead projector, while a background narrative was read from the book. The first of the National Wargames Championships Conventions originated here, where a silver salver presented by Airfix Productions Ltd was fought for. The attendance of the events gradually increased each time.

In 1962 Don also wrote his first book War Games which went on to sell around the world.

Don’s first set of rules

This set of rules would be the first of 40+ publications by Don and launched him to become an iconic wargame writer of the 20th Century. Backed by his own military experience, his study of history and his excellent writing ability Donald Featherstone can truly be called the Father of Wargaming in Britain and the entire wargaming community owes him so much for where we find ourselves today.

Don always said that wargaming is a social hobby and that players everywhere should never forget that.

Normally I would list a few choice selections of the designer I’ve covered in the article. However, because of my deepest respect for this man I decided to list every ruleset he has written.

Don’s Rulesets

I wanted to close with some of Don’s advice on military service.

Don’s Military Advice

1) Never volunteer for anything. War is dangerous, if volunteers are asked for, the task must be really dangerous.

2) Never join the infantry, they take the casualties.

3) Never take unnecessary chances.

4) Never go into any building first, even if they enemy have retreated.

5) Never be in the first tank.

6) Never ride on the first tank.

7) Officers go first, they get the medals.

This Weekends Releases 2nd October 2021

This weekend sees the Black Templar army set go up for pre-order. Games Workshop are also releasing two old Blood Bowl teams from the 90’s as made to order for a limited time period.

Warlord are releasing a supplement for Bolt Action – Italy: Soft Underbelly. To go with this they are also releasing a shed load of miniature sets for World War 2 Italian armies.

Warlord are also releasing Project Z this month, which is their Zombie Apocalypse survival game.

A number of new releases this month for Mantic for Deadzone, Kings of War and Armada.

The Woeful Brush Painting Competition Sponsored by SCN Hobby World

Closing date for entries 30th November. £1 entry, win your choice of a Start Collecting or Combat Patrol box set!

LINK

Game Review – Blood Red Skies

Type:World War 2/Aviation
Scale:1/200th
Players:2+
Age:12+
Game Length:30-60 Minutes
Starter Box Cost:£45
Designer(s):Andy Chambers
Publisher:Warlord Games
Complexity:2.6/5.0
Board Game Geek Rating:7.4 (166 Ratings)

Blood Red Skies is the new World War II mass air combat game from Warlord Games, written by renowned game developer Andy Chambers.

Packed with everything you need to play this fast paced air combat game, the Blood Red Skies starter set does what it says on the tin. Plus once started you’ll have the extra rules to introduce the play cards that really bring your fighter aircraft to life, allowing you to fly them just as they would have been by the Aces of WW2!

Description from Warlord Games

First of all, right off the bat, this isn’t a simulation game. If simulation of World War 2 dogfights is what you’re looking for then this isn’t the game for you.

Blood Red Skies: Battle of Britain

However that being said, there has been a lot of work that has gone into the rules to give them an authentic ‘feel’ of the period.

The Blood Red Skies: Battle of Britain starter set contains everything you will need to carry out air battles over the British Isles in World War 2. With six Spitfires, six Messerschmitt BF-109s and a number of scenarios through which the players can jump straight in.

The minis unpainted

The games core mechanic revolves around aircraft being Advantaged, Neutral and Disadvantaged. Disadvantaged aircraft cannot shoot aircraft that are Advantaged or Neutral and Neutral aircraft cannot shoot Advantaged aircraft. However, you can choose to make your aircraft disadvantaged to gain manoeuvrability and enabling you to try and get on the tale of enemy aircraft.

Scoring is done by using boom chits, where any shots that hit the enemy cause a chit regardless of whether it causes damage. Once a player has more chits against them than they have aircraft then their squadron are forced to break contact with the enemy and head for home. This can mean that games are over without a single aircraft being shot down, which is true to the real life dogfights that would be carried our in the skies during World War 2.

Painted Luftwaffe Aircraft

Gameplay is quick with a loop of Shoot-Move-Action that is enhanced by the use of the action deck, with extra abilities and events. These cards can be selected based on the planes in use and the period of the war the combat is taking place.

Downsides of the game are that the pilot discs are easy to damage when inserting or removing them from the plane bases. Measuring can also be tricky with arcs being difficult to set on the circular bases.

That said, this game is fantastic and is ideal for a quick pick up and play game during a lunch break or a spare 30 minutes with friends in between other games.