Solo Wargaming – Part 2

Following on from my previous article, I wanted to share my progression to date and how I envision the whole system working once its up and running.

There will be a total of three different card decks used in any game.

Battleplan Deployment Deck

This deck comes with a cover card denoting how the deployment draw is carried out, what each objective number is and how to layout any scenery.

Battleplan Card

The deck also includes a number of other cards. A card is drawn for each Card Controlled unit in the army. This card then details how that unit will be deployed and in what order. The order of their deployment is determined by the number on the shield at the bottom of the card. This acts as an initiative order for deployment.

Battle Tactic Action Deck

There is an overall Battle Tactic card for each tactic in the game. At the beginning of the game you would take the overall cards for Monstrous Takeover, Ferocious Advance, Aggressive Expansion and Conquer and shuffle these together. One is then drawn at random which will be the Card Controlled army’s Battle Tactic that turn. The following turn the Broken Ranks battle card is added in and the one used in the previous turn discarded. In turn three the remaining battle tactic cards are added with used cards continually being discarded.

The Broken Ranks Battle Tactic Card

The Battle Tactic Deck which contains the actions for the units are then shuffled together with 1/5 of the deck of Battleplan Action Cards and one of these is drawn for each Card Controlled unit in the game that turn. These cards denote how and when these units move and shoot etc.

Broken Ranks Action Card

I have started a Patreon for anyone who is wishing to support me in this endeavour, and you can support from as little as £1 per month. Proceeds of Patreon will go towards making these into Physical products.

Solo Wargaming for your Favourite Games

I’m in the process of creating a series of Wargaming Aids which allow players to play their favourite games in a single player format against an AI controlled enemy army. To find out more on this click here.

For as little as £1 a month (the price of a chocolate bar) you can help support me in this endeavour and receive cool perks as a thank you, such as access to our Discord Server as well as downloadable copies of the gaming aids which you can print out and use at home.

Why not pop over to Patreon and sign up and help me in this project? Money raised will go towards making these as physical products.

The Woeful Brush Painting Competition Sponsored by SCN Hobby World

Closing date for entries 30th November. £1 entry, win your choice of a Start Collecting or Combat Patrol box set!

LINK

Rick Priestley – A Life in Wargames

Rick Priestley alongside Jervis Johnson, Alessio Cavatore and Andy Chambers is perhaps one of the most well known game designers of our era.

Rick Priestley grew up in Lincoln and dtart d writing wargames as a teenager with his friend Richard Halliwell. In 1979 the pair wrote their first game Reaper while still in school. Tabletop Games (a small games publishing company with no sales output) printed their rules and they contacted Brian Ansell who worked for Asgard Miniatures at the time before his move to Citadel Miniatures. Brian Ansell put them in contact with Nottingham Toy Soldier Shop who agreed to sell the Reaper rules.

Halliwell & Preistley’s first game

With one rulebook for sale, Halliwell and Priestley collaborated on a second effort, a science fiction miniatures wargame titled Combat 3000, also published by Tabletop, that used 15mm/25mm “space marine” miniatures from Asgard. Around this time Brian Ansell left Asgard Miniatures, and with backing from Games Workshop set up Citadel Miniatures.

Priestley joined Games Workshop in 1982 as part of their subsidiary company Citadel Miniatures. At that time Citadel produced the miniatures for use in Dungeons and Dragons. Brian Ansell the manager of Citadel asked Richard Halliwell to develop Games Workshops’ first in-house game, Warhammer Fantasy Battles and Rick Priestley and Tony Ackland developed the product. Warhammer Fantasy contained many of the core mechanics or Priestley and Halliwell’s earlier game Reaper. Warhammer Fantasy was released in 1983 and was a huge success.

It allowed them a vehicle through which they could sell their own Citadel Miniatures. Earlier miniature wargames were designed to be played using generic models that could be bought from any manufacturer, but Warhammer Fantasy’s setting featured original characters with distinctive visual designs, and their models were produced exclusively by Games Workshop. This paved the way for Games Workshop to become the company it is today – all thanks to the three men who developed that first game.

Since before his time at Games Workshop Priestley had been working on a set of rules of Spaceship Combat called Rogue Trader which mixed Science fiction and fantasy elements. Priestley incorporated many aspects of this setting such as the lore and space travel into Warhammer 40,000 and dropped the ship combat element due to not having enough room in the book.

Warhammer 40,000: Rogue Trader

Games Workshop planned to sell conversion kits for their fantasy line to make them useable in Rogue Trader but eventually decided to instead dedicate an entire production line to the game and in 1987 Warhammer 40,000: Rogue Trader was born.

During his years with Games Workshop he was involved in the design of virtually all of their top games such as Necromunda, Mordheim, Warmaster, Lord of the Rings, Gorkamorka, Mighty Empires and Warhammer Ancient Battles (affectionately known as WAB by those in Historical gaming circles).

Warhammer Ancient Battles (WAB)

Rick Priestley left Games Workshop in 2009 stating that the corporate culture had grown too focused on sales and no longer cared about innovation in Games Design. He expanded on his view of Games Workshop in an article with Bell of Lost Souls in March 2015. In that, his thoughts on where Games Workshop was heading, was as a manufacturer of collectible miniatures and not games design.

After Games Workshop, Priestley co-founded Warlord Games which after Games Workshop is arguably the next biggest games and miniature manufacturer in Europe.

With Warlord Games, Rick Priestley has continued to develop fantastic wargame rulesets and being no longer held back by Games Workshop, these have included historical as well as Fantasy and Sci-Fi. The biggest games at Warlord such as Bolt Action, Black Powder, Gates of Antares, Hail Caesar, Pike and Shotte and Warlords or Erehwon have all been designed with Priestley’s input.

Bolt Action

In 2011 Rick Priestley was elected to the committee of the Society of Ancients. The Society of Ancients is a non-profit organisation that intends to promote interest in Ancient and Medieval history and wargaming.

This man is a true legend of Wargaming, is the father of Warhammer Fantasy and Warhammer 40,000 and has done a lot that Games Workshop fans and historical wargaming fans have to thank him for.

I have tried to give a flavour of the 115+ rules and add-on’s he’s developed below. But as with Jervis’ article, this really does not even scrape the surface as to the lore and depth of his many games. Rick, thank you! I can’t wait to see what you come up with next.

Sources

Board Game Geek

Wikipedia – Warhammer 40,000

Warlord Games

Bell of Lost Souls

Wikipedia – Wargame

Wikipedia – Rick Priestley

Wikipedia – Richard Halliwell

Solo Wargaming for your Favourite Games

I’m in the process of creating a series of Wargaming Aids which allow players to play their favourite games in a single player format against an AI controlled enemy army. To find out more on this click here.

For as little as £1 a month (the price of a chocolate bar) you can help support me in this endeavour and receive cool perks as a thank you, such as access to our Discord Server as well as downloadable copies of the gaming aids which you can print out and use at home.

Why not pop over to Patreon and sign up and help me in this project? Money raised will go towards making these as physical products.

The Woeful Brush Painting Competition Sponsored by SCN Hobby World

Closing date for entries 30th November. £1 entry, win your choice of a Start Collecting or Combat Patrol box set!

LINK

The Woeful Brush Painting Competition Sponsored by SCN Hobby World

Closing date for entries 30th November. £1 entry, win your choice of a Start Collecting or Combat Patrol box set!

LINK

The Woeful Brush Painting Competition Sponsored by SCN Hobby World

Closing date for entries 30th November. £1 entry, win your choice of a Start Collecting or Combat Patrol box set!

LINK

#Woehammer Roundup 17th October 2021

Two submissions this week under the #Woehammer on Twitter. Both members of the team.

If you want to see your miniatures on the site remember to use the hashtag #woehammer either on Twitter or Instagram.

Dave has started a new 40k 9th Edition army, this time focusing on the Space Marine Chapter the Imperial Fists. The model below is his first Marine for the army, and I think you’ll agree its a stunner!

Dave’s Imperial Fist

Dave has gone for an awesome golden yellow armour tone and black trim denoting the 5th Company.

The detail on the base is great, and I especially love the coiled barbed wire and spent casings next to the dismembered head.

It’s little different this week for Declan’s submission, here we have an army shot of the force he took to Mancunian Carnage last weekend.

The blue armour really stands out along with the spots of Red. Declan has joked in the past that his Orcs have been called the Crimson Fists. It’s a great army and Declan finished the weekend 3-2!

And talking of Declan’s fantastic tournament performance, only yesterday he was interviewed by the AOS Coach on YouTube about the Gloomspite Gitz! I’ve included the video below for you to watch.

Remember to use the #woehammer for your painting. While you’re at it why don’t you check out our painting competition below where you could win a Start Collecting or Combat Patrol box of your choice all thanks to our sponsors SCN Hobby World. By signing up to their mailing list you receive 25% off all GW products or 15% for the web only products.

The Woeful Brush Painting Competition Sponsored by SCN Hobby World

Closing date for entries 30th November. £1 entry, win your choice of a Start Collecting or Combat Patrol box set!

LINK

The Woeful Brush Painting Competition Sponsored by SCN Hobby World

Closing date for entries 30th November. £1 entry, win your choice of a Start Collecting or Combat Patrol box set!

LINK

Solo Wargaming for your Favourite Games

I’m in the process of creating a series of Wargaming Aids which allow players to play their favourite games in a single player format against an AI controlled enemy army. To find out more on this click here.

For as little as £1 a month (the price of a chocolate bar) you can help support me in this endeavour and receive cool perks as a thank you, such as access to our Discord Server as well as downloadable copies of the gaming aids which you can print out and use at home.

Why not pop over to Patreon and sign up and help me in this project? Money raised will go towards making these as physical products.

The Woeful Brush Painting Competition Sponsored by SCN Hobby World

Closing date for entries 30th November. £1 entry, win your choice of a Start Collecting or Combat Patrol box set!

LINK

This Weekends Releases 16th October 2021

This weekend Games Workshop releases their latest Warhammer Underworlds boxed set Harrow Deep.

Warlord are releasing a massive amount of kits for Blood Red Skies, Hail Caesar and Black Powder.

Mordiphius have a number of new releases for their fall out miniatures game.

Reaper Miniatures have a massive amount of sets being released this month.

Solo Wargaming for your Favourite Games

I’m in the process of creating a series of Wargaming Aids which allow players to play their favourite games in a single player format against an AI controlled enemy army. To find out more on this click here.

For as little as £1 a month (the price of a chocolate bar) you can help support me in this endeavour and receive cool perks as a thank you, such as access to our Discord Server as well as downloadable copies of the gaming aids which you can print out and use at home.

Why not pop over to Patreon and sign up and help me in this project? Money raised will go towards making these as physical products.

The Woeful Brush Painting Competition Sponsored by SCN Hobby World

Closing date for entries 30th November. £1 entry, win your choice of a Start Collecting or Combat Patrol box set!

LINK

The Woeful Brush Painting Competition Sponsored by SCN Hobby World

Closing date for entries 30th November. £1 entry, win your choice of a Start Collecting or Combat Patrol box set!

LINK

Book Review – Beast Arises Books 2-4

Predator, Prey by Rob Sanders; The Emperor Expects by Gav Thorpe; The Last Wall by David Annandale

As mentioned in my previous book review on I Am Slaughter by Dan Abnett, The Beast Arises series is now available in compilation E-books. The first of these – Beast Arises Volume 1 – contains the first four books. If you missed that review it can be found here…

There are some spoilers for later in the series included below… you have been warned!!

If you’re keen to hear my opinion on books 2 – 4 just read on:

Predator, Prey by Rob Sanders

This is a great fun, quick to read addition to the story. The Orks are starting to threaten the security and survivability of the Imperium and the Lords of Terra are starting to believe that this may be a threat they need to engage. It’s unashamedly pulp-fiction but it’s fun pulp!

The Emperor Expects by Gav Thorpe

The Beast Ork invasion is ongoing and threatening the Imperium whilst the High Lords of Terra are being taken over by the Navy… who really need to be killing Orks.

More characters are being introduced, and some expansion on the power, prestige, and inertia of the High Lords of Terra continues to add interesting twists to the story. This is still very much about the Imperium though, and whilst the Orks are the greatest threat since the Horus Heresy, there is little included about them.

A great, fast paced addition to the Beast / Ork Invasion series.

The Last Wall by David Annandale

An Ork moon sits over Terra and the Space Marines designated to guard Holy Terra are destroyed… what’s worse, the Black Templars and other successor chapters of the Imperial Fists are too far away to make it back in time.

The High Lords call on volunteers and the Astra Militarum (Imperial Guard) to assault the Ork Attack Moon. With the help of the Imperial Navy, and their transport vessels can they make it through and destroy the Moon?

The fourth in the series – another short novella lengths story – they continue to be interesting stories from the 31st Millenium, but do lack for any overarching peril in the story telling. Whilst people and ships can die, we know that the Imperium eventually overcomes the threat.

Some interesting ideas, and fun set pieces – the first four books are an fun light read.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

— Declan

Warhammer 40,000: Imperium – Issue 4

Previous posts:

Issue 1
Issue 2
Issue 3

Unfortunately my work week has been extremely busy this week and I’ve not managed to get any painting time in yet. This means that my Imperium backlog is slowly mounting up, with the list now standing at:

  • Space Marine Lieutenant
  • 3 Assault Intercessors
  • 3 Necron Warriors
  • 3 Skorpekh Destroyers
  • 1 Plasmacyte

Still, with the paint scheme I’m going for on the Necrons, I know those at least will be fairly quick to do.

Issue 4

I mentioned at the end of the article last week what good value issue 4 is, and its worth repeating now. In this issue you receive a pot of Leadbelcher paint worth £2.75 plus three Skorpekh Destroyers and a Plasmacyte. As I also mentioned the equivalent kit on Games Workshop goes for £34.50 on the Games Workshop site:

For an issue worth £8 this is a bargain, with nearly £40 worth of goodies included. You’re also given a lovely thick battle matt to replace the smaller one given to you in issue 1.

The issue itself is the same as the others so far with lore, building and painting guides. The lore this week covers the creation of a Space Marine and their progression within a chapter. You’re given the obligatory battle record for the Skorpekh Destroyers and the more I see of these battle records the more I love them.

You’re also given the biggest battle to date where you can line up your Lieutenant and Assault Intercessors against the Skorpekh Destroyers and Plasmacyte. I will play through these scenarios once I have painted the models and post the results here to create my own little story of the war between the Void Dragons and Necrons.

Next weeks issue sees a Space Marine Captain enter the fray, and this model is one that is unique to the Imperium magazine series as it is currently unavailable through the Games Workshop website.

Solo Wargaming for your Favourite Games

I’m in the process of creating a series of Wargaming Aids which allow players to play their favourite games in a single player format against an AI controlled enemy army. To find out more on this click here.

For as little as £1 a month (the price of a chocolate bar) you can help support me in this endeavour and receive cool perks as a thank you, such as access to our Discord Server as well as downloadable copies of the gaming aids which you can print out and use at home.

Why not pop over to Patreon and sign up and help me in this project? Money raised will go towards making these as physical products.

The Woeful Brush Painting Competition Sponsored by SCN Hobby World

Closing date for entries 30th November. £1 entry, win your choice of a Start Collecting or Combat Patrol box set!

LINK

The Woeful Brush Painting Competition Sponsored by SCN Hobby World

Closing date for entries 30th November. £1 entry, win your choice of a Start Collecting or Combat Patrol box set!

LINK

Solo Wargaming in Age of Sigmar

I’ve been toying with the idea for a while now on creating a solo wargaming experience for wargames, but primarily at this point focused on Age of Sigmar.

The idea behind the system is relatively simple, with a deck of cards for each battle tactic. The battle tactics will be decided some simple mechanics at the start of the turn, and depending on which is chosen that deck of cards would be used.

Each faction would be classed as either Aggressive, Neutral or Cautious. For example an army such as Orruk Warclans would be Aggressive, Cities of Sigmar Neutral and Kharadron Overlords would be Cautious. This categories would have purpose when units are interacting with objectives on the battlefield.

When an AI unit is near an objective, you would roll a D6 and refer to their aggression level:

Aggressive4+
Neutral5+
Cautious6+

If the score is equal to or higher than these scores then the AI unit will draw a card from the deck and carry out its instructions.

These would be on regular playing card size cards and a card would be drawn for each AI unit on the battlefield.

Below is an example card from the Broken Ranks deck that I’ve created for Age of Sigmar.

Based on the units keywords you would choose the relevant box for its instructions. For example Orruk Brutes may be classed as Melee, while Archeon could be classed as a Monster or as a Hero, however as the Monster box is above the Hero box on this card the Monster box takes priority.

I am developing these not only for AoS but for other major game systems as well. It’s early days by I’m hoping to have the first full deck ready to download from my Patreon page in the next couple of months.

If you’re interested in joining and supporting me on Patreon then please follow this link. You can become a supporter for as little as £1 per month.

The Woeful Brush Painting Competition Sponsored by SCN Hobby World

Closing date for entries 30th November. £1 entry, win your choice of a Start Collecting or Combat Patrol box set!

LINK

The History of Wargaming – Part 1

Wargaming as a pastime has been around for almost 250 years. In this two part series I will highlight the major rulesets written since the beginning and my take on where wargaming may go next.

Johann Christian Ludwig Hellwig

The first wargame was invented in 1780 by the Prussian Johann Christian Ludwig Hellwig. This was the first true wargame as it attempted to simulate the wars of the time and so give future military officers lessons in strategy (it’s worth noting that during this period, Prussia was THE power in Europe and her armies and officers were admired the world over).

Hellwig wanted to sell his wargame commercially and so chose to base the game on Chess. He hoped by doing this, it would make it appeal to chess players.

The grid layout for Hellwig’s game

Like Chess, Hellwig’s game was based on a grid of squares, albeit much larger. These squares were colour coded to represent different terrain such as swamps, mountains, hills, rivers etc. The layout of this terrain was not set and so players could change the layout and have a unique experience each time they played. Playing pieces represented Artillery, Cavalry and Infantry, as well as other support units. Like in Chess only a single piece could occupy any square and all the pieces moved square by square either laterally or diagonally. Over normal terrain infantry could move eight squares, Dragoons twelve squares and light cavalry sixteen squares. Rivers could only be crossed with pontoons or bridges and a player could only move one piece per turn. Pieces could capture other pieces by moving onto an opposing pieces square, much like Chess. Unlike Chess however, the artillery and infantry pieces could shoot.

Johann Georg Julius Venturini

Hellwig’s game was a commercial success and this success inspired other inventors to create their own chess-like wargames. In 1796 another Prussian named Johann Georg Julius Venturini create a game very similar to Hellwig’s, only with larger squares and rules for logistics such as convoys and mobile bakeries. He also incorporated seasons and weather, which made his game perhaps the first operational level wargame.

Johann Ferdinand Opiz

In 1806 another Johann, this time one from Austria named Johann Ferdinand Opiz developed a game which was aimed both for civilian and military markets. Like Hellwig’s it also used a modular square game board, but unlike Hellwig’s, Opiz’s game introduced dice rolls to add an element of randomness to the game to attempt to simulate the unpredictability of real warfare. Hellwig himself felt that the addition of randomness spoiled the fun for players.

The major criticisms of the three Johann’s games were that pieces were restricted in movement across a grid like battlefield and that only one piece could occupy any square at a given point regardless of how large that square was. The grid like fashion also meant that terrain took on unusual forms with rivers flowing in straight lines and bending in right angles. This lack of realism meant that no army took the games seriously.

Georg Heinrich Rudolf Johann von Reisswitz – Kriegsspiel

In 1824 yet another Prussian, and yet another man who was named Johann (this time as a middle name) took the opportunity to use his position as a Prussian army officer to present to the Prussian General Staff a highly realistic wargame that he and his father had developed over the last few years. This game would become one of the most famous wargames of all time and is still played today – Kriegsspiel.

A rendition of an 1824 game of Kreigspiel

Kreigsspiel was played an scale paper maps with pieces that were accurately sized to the units they were meant to represent. All of this allowed the game to model battles in real locations with pieces being moved across the battle in a free-form and subject to terrain. The pieces were coloured with blue playing pieces representing those of the Prussian army and red pieces representing the enemy. This idea of red versus blue persists through into wargaming and computer gaming today and can be attributed to Kreigsspiel. Kreigsspiel also used dice to add an element of randomness to the simulation like Opiz’s game.

The game modelled the capabilities of units realistically using data gathered during the Napoleonic Wars. A manual provided tables and lists as to how far each unit in the game was able to move according to the terrain it was attempting to cross. An umpire used a ruler to move these pieces across the map with the players advising the umpire what moves they would like to make. By doing this, this created a fog of war with each player only able to see what enemy units had been discovered on their own map. Combat was determined by dice rolls and units would have casualties inflicted upon them rather than being removed from play immediately. Firearms and artillery fire’s effectiveness decreased over distance and units strength was tracked using hit points with additional rules for both morale and exhaustion.

Earlier wargames had fixed victory conditions, such as occupying the enemy’s fortress. By contrast, Reisswitz’s wargame was open-ended. The umpire decided what the victory conditions were, if there were to be any, and they typically resembled the goals an actual army in battle might aim for. The emphasis was on the experience of decision-making and strategic thinking, not on competition. As Reisswitz himself wrote: “The winning or losing, in the sense of a card or board game, does not come into it.”

The Prussian king and the General Staff officially endorsed Reisswitz’s wargame, and by the end of the decade every German regiment had bought materials for it. This was thus the first wargame to be widely adopted by a military as a serious tool for training and research. Over the years, the Prussians developed new variations of Reisswitz’s system to incorporate new technologies and doctrine.

Reference
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wargame

The Woeful Brush Painting Competition Sponsored by SCN Hobby World

Closing date for entries 30th November. £1 entry, win your choice of a Start Collecting or Combat Patrol box set!

LINK

Gav Thorpe – A Life in Wargames

Born in Hertfordshire, Thorpe joined Games Workshop in 1993. Where he stayed for fourteen years, holding various positions, but being most known as a games developer, background designer and author of background fiction. He left Games Workshop in 2008 to concentrate on being a full-time author and has produced many novels and stories for the Black Library.

Gav Thorpe’s most famous work



Gav Thorpe worked in almost all aspects of Games Workshop, making his way up from assistant games developer to being placed in charge of the Warhammer Fantasy games system. He also contributed to the development and design of several editions of Warhammer 40,000, as well as writing articles for White Dwarf magazine and being the originator and lead developer of the Inquisitor games system. One of his last positions before leaving Games Workshop was an oversight role over all Games Workshop background and IP. His influence on the development of the Warhammer 40,000 background continues at present with the publication of his work for the Black Library.

The Woeful Brush Painting Competition Sponsored by SCN Hobby World

Closing date for entries 30th November. £1 entry, win your choice of a Start Collecting or Combat Patrol box set!

LINK

This Weekends Releases 2nd October 2021

This weekend sees the Black Templar army set go up for pre-order. Games Workshop are also releasing two old Blood Bowl teams from the 90’s as made to order for a limited time period.

Warlord are releasing a supplement for Bolt Action – Italy: Soft Underbelly. To go with this they are also releasing a shed load of miniature sets for World War 2 Italian armies.

Warlord are also releasing Project Z this month, which is their Zombie Apocalypse survival game.

A number of new releases this month for Mantic for Deadzone, Kings of War and Armada.

The Woeful Brush Painting Competition Sponsored by SCN Hobby World

Closing date for entries 30th November. £1 entry, win your choice of a Start Collecting or Combat Patrol box set!

LINK

Woeful Wargaming